State Superintendent Delays ESSA Plan Submission

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the federal law that replaced No Child Left Behind and requires states to develop plans that address academic standards, assessments, school accountability and assistance for struggling schools.
The Ohio Department of Education (ODE) spent months gathering public input from more than 15,000 Ohioans before releasing its draft plan. Educators, parents, students and community members sent a clear message about how the state’s draft plan was not responsive to their concerns.
Released in early February, the state’s draft plan was open for public comment until March 6. Despite having a September deadline for submission, ODE had stated its intent to proceed with its submission of the plan in April—five months before the deadline.
State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria announced today that the Department “will delay the ESSA submission to the U.S. Department of Education to September.”
“This will allow more time to ensure that feedback received on the draft template can be considered carefully,” added DeMaria. To read the State Superintendent’s letter, click here.

Every Child Succeeds being rethought

The New York Times  reports that Congress has approved legislation “to repeal crucial regulations associated with the Every Student Succeeds Act, one of President Barack Obama’s final legislative achievements.” The Times focuses on the bipartisan effort to approve ESSA in 2015 and contrasts that bill with its predecessor, NCLB. The piece explains that it is “customary for federal agencies to issue detailed regulations on how new laws should be put into effect,” but notes that “some lawmakers from both parties saw” ED’s regulations “as unusually aggressive and far-reaching, and said they could subvert ESSA’s intent of re-establishing local control over education and decreasing the emphasis on testing.”

School choice could be ramped up

The NEA shared reports about President Trump’s recent address to Congress, in which he indicated that he “remains serious about his campaign-trail pledge to expand school choice,” urging Congress “to ‘pass an education bill that funds school choice for disadvantaged youth, including millions of African-American and Latino children. These families should be free to choose the public, private, charter, magnet, religious, or home school that is right for them.’” However, the piece reports, the Trump administration has yet to release any concrete details about its plans, and “it remains tough to say what other policy proposals might be on the president’s K-12 priority list.” The piece contrasts this with President Obama and President George W. Bush, “both of whom were knee-deep at this point in their presidencies in the education initiatives that would define their K-12 legacies.”