Ohio wins Race to the Top Round 2

The Columbus Education Association is proud to announce that our signing on to Ohio’s Race to the Top (RttT) grant application helped the state win $400 million. The Columbus City Schools will receive $20.5 million over the next four years.

The competitive grant was designed to promote reform across four key areas:
* Adopting standards and assessments that prepare students to succeed in college and the workplace
* Building data systems that measure student growth and success and informing teachers and principals how to improve instruction
* Recruiting, developing, rewarding and retaining effective teachers and principals, especially where they are needed most
* Turning around their lowest-performing schools

Ten states won this time. Each has adopted rigorous common college- and career-ready standards in reading and math and have created pipelines and incentives to put the most effective teachers in high-needs schools. Additionally, all second-round winners developed alternative pathways to teacher and principal certification.

The next step is planning the specifics the grant will address. The Reform Panel will act as the transformation team to oversee the RttT program. Management and labor have committed to work collaboratively through the collective bargaining process to address areas of the RttT program that differ from the contract. The deadline for the plan is November 2010.

Ohio has a great strategy for public schools–the Ohio Education Opportunity Act, also known as House Bill 1. RttT dollars now give us the chance to implement that vision at a faster pace than without this funding.

OEA staff will provide technical assistance and consulting advice to CEA as we strive within our school community to use RttT dollars wisely.

OEA President Patricia Frost-Brooks said at the press conference: “I want to congratulate everyone who worked on Ohios application. This will truly help all of us move our public education system from fifth to first in the nation.”

Video: "Bringing Learning To Life" grant announcement

NEA President Dennis Van Roekel, OEA President Patricia Frost-Brooks and CEA President Rhonda Johnson joined Gov. Ted Strickland, Supt. Gene Harris and other dignitaries at South Mifflin STEM Academy to announce the award of a $550,000 service learning grant from the federal government.

Awarded by the Corporation for National and Community Service, the “Bringing Learning to Life” grant partners include NEA, OEA, CEA, CCS and The Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology. Check out NEA’s video of the event.

Speak Out: Web 2.0 and you

"2.0 buttons/badges" from Flickr user vespertin.

The creation of the World Wide Web in the early 1990’s caused an immediate and dramatic shift in how the world shared information. Educators were among the first groups of professionals to recognize and take advantage of the important resources offered by Web to improve teaching and learning in our classrooms.

Over the past 20 years, the Web has quickly evolved from its original purpose of information storage and retrieval to become a virtual space where interaction, collaboration and learning between online users is the norm. This “newer” version of the Web is collectively referred to as “Web 2.0”.

Wikipedia (itself a Web 2.0 site) provides the following definition of Web 2.0:

The term “Web 2.0” is commonly associated with web applications that facilitate interactive information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design and collaboration on the World Wide Web.

The CEA Blog asks the following question:

As an education professional, what Web 2.0 tools have you used to create and/or deliver learning experiences to your students? What sites would you recommend to other educators?

 Visitors to the CEA Blog do not need to be registered to leave a reply. Simply click on the “Comments” link directly below the post title. Type in a screen name of your choice, enter your email address and leave your comment. Please make sure your comment adheres to our posting guidelines. Once your comment has been moderated, it will be visible to all visitors to the CEA Blog.