Speak Out: What books did you donate to Reach Out and Read?

Join CEA and participate in the Nationwide Children’s Hospital’s Reach Out and Read Community Book Drive. The program gives age-appropriate books to patients during well-child visits at Children’s Close to Home Clinics.

CEA is asking each member to donate two new books for children ages 6 months to 5 years. Our goal is to exceed last year’s collection of more than 3,200 books. The campaign runs through Friday, Mar. 5. Your Faculty Representative can tell you where you can drop off your books in your building.

The leadership of the Columbus Education Association would like to share the significance of one of the two children’s books they donated.

The CEA Blog asks members the following question:

What is the significance of one of the children’s books you donated to the Reach Out and Read campaign?

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CEA President Rhonda Johnson taught business at Northwest Career Center. Rhonda donated Horton Hears A Who by Dr. Seuss. Horton said that even though you can’t see or hear them at all, a person’s a person, no matter how small. “I was always the smallest student in my class and always felt the need to be heard,” said Johnson.

CEA Vice President Sally Oldham was an elementary school teacher. One of the books Sally donated was Stone Soup by Marcia Brown. “Stone Soup is a story about a group of people with shared interests who identify a challenge,” said Oldham. “They join together and accomplished their goals. Stone Soup is a great book, and I loved reading this book to my class at Easthaven.”

District 1 Governor Greg Goodlander teaches math and social studies at Ecole Kenwood “My mom read The Giving Tree to me every week for a year when I was young,” said Goodlander. “Shel Silverstein’s book shows the powerful message of sharing and what it means to grow up.”

District 2 Governor Jan Bell teaches English, social studies and math to hearing-impaired students at Northland HS. Jan’s donation included Baby Signs by Linda Acredolo. “Baby Signs is important to me because I teach hearing-impaired students through American Sign Language,” said Bell.

District 3 Governor Donna Baker teaches K-5 science and grade 3 math at Cassady ES. Donna donated Where’s Spot? by Eric Hill. “I gave the entire Spot series to my youngest son when he was growing up,” said Baker. “It helped me teach him how to read.”

District 4 Governor Dwayne Zimmerman teaches vocal music at his alma mater, Linden-McKinley STEM Academy. Zimmerman’s donation to the campaign included Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss. “In elementary school, they used to put green food coloring in the eggs and we’d eat it because of Green Eggs and Ham,” said Zimmerman. “I think that book is the reason I enjoy cooking now.”

District 5 Governor Christy Maser teaches grade 7 and 8 social studies at Eastmoor MS. One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish by Dr. Seuss was one of the books Maser donated. “I love Dr. Seuss’ rhymes and his wittiness,” said Maser. “In early literacy, it’s vital for children to establish and understand rhyming-word combinations.”

District 6 Governor Teri Mullins teaches special education language arts and science at Wedgewood MS. Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak was one of the books that she donated. “Where the Wild Things Are was the first book I remember being read to me at school,” said the East HS graduate.

District 7 Governor Tai Hayden teaches kindergarten at Deshler ES. One of the books she donated was Girls Hold Up This World by Jada Pinkett-Smith. “Girls Hold Up This World reflects the dominant female force that has played a major role in my life,” said the CAHS graduate.

District 8 Governor Alice Munnerlyn is the library media specialist at South HS. Just Go To Bed by Mercer Mayer was one of Alice’s contributions to the campaign. “Just Go To Bed is important to me because it teaches children why they have to do the things parents ask them to do,” said Munnerlyn.

District 9 Governor Cindy “CJ” Jamison teaches grade 3 at Leawood ES. She donated Eve of the Emperor Penguin by Mary Pope Osborne to the campaign. “In Eve of the Emperor Penguin, the magic treehouse takes them to Antarctica,” said Jamison. “Many of my students wonder what it’s like there.”

District 10 Governor Lori Cannon is the work study coordinator for Northland HS. One of her contributions to the campaign was Oh the Places You’ll Go!  by Dr. Seuss. “A friend of mine gave me the book when I had cancer,” said Cannon, a breast cancer survivor. “Everyone gave me all of these healing  books, but she gave me Oh The Places You’ll Go! It really stood out.”

District 11 Governor Bonita Agnew teaches art at Parsons ES. This CCS teacher and artist donated Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. “Snow White was the first movie I ever saw,” remembers Agnew. “It is both a classic story and movie.”

High School Governor-At-Large Philip Hayes is a social studies teacher at Brookhaven HS. One of his contributions was Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs by Judi Barrett. “There was one dog-eared copy of Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs in my elementary school library,” said Hayes. “I considered myself lucky when I was able to check it out and was sad when I had to return it.”

Middle School Governor-At-Large Diana Welsh is a physical education and health teacher at Dominion MS. One of the books shen donated was 101 Dalmatians. “I used to read along to 101 Dalmatians on an LP while rocking in my rocking chair,” said the graduate of Northland HS. “I wore out the LP and rocked my chair so much the little bell wore out, and it just clicked every time I would rock.”

Visitors to the CEA Blog do not need to be registered to leave a reply. Simply click on the “Comments” link directly below the post title. Type in a screen name of your choice, enter your email address and leave your comment. Please make sure your comment adheres to our posting guidelines. Once your comment has been moderated, it will be visible to all visitors to the CEA Blog.