Education By The Numbers: Teaching and student achievement

Image by flickr user Stewf.

Image by flickr user Stewf.

The world of education is awash with an ocean of facts, figures and numbers that relate to  teaching and student achievement.

Join The CEA Blog as it presents a sampling of facts and figures that pertain to the education world, brought to light during this past week.

75:

Percentage of college students in a recent study that prefer “traditional” textbooks to e-textbooks (like Kindle), despite the fact that college textbook prices are increasing faster than inflation.

50:

The number of things new teachers need to know, according to edu-blogger Gently Hew Stone.

27:

The number of years English teacher Frank McCourt spent in the New York City school system. McCourt, author of Angela’s Ashes and Teacher Man passed away earlier this week at 78. NEA Today interviewed him a few years back. You can read it here.

18.4:

Average weight (in pounds) of a 6th grade student’s backpack in New York City, says Joanne Jacobs by way of The New York Times. Some weighed as much as 30 pounds.

12:

The number of Florida school districts warned for their elementary students’ apparent use of “template writing” on state achievement tests. The practice involves the simultaneous use of memorized phrases to make student writing appear more creative (and score higher on standardized tests).

10:

Number of minutes of homework students should be given per grade level, according to a Duke University psychology professor’s guidelines, endorsed by the NEA.

4:

The number of Most Valuable Teachers in Ryan from I Thought A Think’s first grade team, according to testing data. (There are four teachers in his first grade team.)

3:

The number of days’ notice 2,600 teachers in Detroit Public Schools had to reapply for their jobs at the district’s 41 reconstituted schools. (H/t Edweek’s Teacher Beat.)

0:

The number of interactions teachers in Ohio’s Boardman School District are allowed to have with their students online, according to a new policy adopted by the district’s school board.