Archives for December 2011

The twelve days of testing

On the first day of testing,
my students gave to me
an unfinished TRC.

On the second day of testing,
my students gave to me
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the third day of testing,
my students gave to me
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the fourth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the fifth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

 

 

 

On the sixth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the seventh day of testing,
my students gave to me
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the eighth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

 

 

 

On the ninth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the tenth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Ten brand new students,
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

 

 

 

 

 

On the eleventh day of testing,
my students gave to me
Eleven shortened specials,
Ten brand new students,
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the twelfth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Twelve long sleepless nights,
Eleven shortened specials,
Ten brand new students,
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC!

HB 191: Tourism vs. Teaching

"Empty Classroom" by flickr user Max Klingensmith

A bill scheduled for a hearing in this week’s House Education Committee meeting would make significant changes to Ohio school districts’ school calendars.

House Bill 191 was introduced in early April of this year by State Representatives Bill Hayes and Bill Patmon and would change the length of the school year. It would switch how the state measures the minimum amount of instructional time from days to hours, simultaneously lengthening and shortening the school year.

Currently, Ohio law requires school districts to provide 182 days of instruction to students, which equates to 910 hours for elementary students and 1,001 hours for middle and high school students. The requirements set forth in HB 191 would lengthen the school year by requiring school districts to add 50 more hours of instruction for elementary, middle and high school students.

Conversely, HB 191 would shorten the number of days in the school year by prohibiting schools from holding classes before Labor Day and requiring them to end before Memorial Day. This would increase the length of summer break and could affect students’ summer learning loss. The legislation does exempt summer school and year-round schools from the start and end requirements.

The bill could also affect how often Ohio’s traditional public school districts close for emergencies. House Bill 36, signed into law by the governor on April 6 of this year increased the number of calamity days for school districts from three to five. HB 191 was introduced the next day and proposes to completely eliminate calamity days for traditional public school districts. However, it exempts charter schools, allowing them to use “calamity hours” given to them in HB 36.

Presently, school districts that shorten their school day by up to two hours due to a late start or an early dismissal still receive credit for a full instructional day under state law. HB 191 removes this provision from the Ohio Revised Code. If a school district decided its schools should start late or dismiss early, the hours of instruction lost would not be counted towards their state-mandated minimum number of hours of instruction under this legislation.

If HB 191 were to become law, it would take effect in the 2012-2013 school year. It would not affect teacher union contracts (including the CEA Master Agreement) entered into before the bill’s effective date. However, any contracts entered into after the bill’s effective date would have to comply with its provisions.

An Ohio Legislative Service Commission fiscal analysis of the bill shows that it will not increase costs for the state, but that schools not currently meeting the bill’s requirements “will likely incur an increase in operating costs.”

So why is there a need to lengthen the summer break of Ohio’s schoolchildren despite repeated calls from educational experts to wage war on students’ summer learning loss?

In a released statement, the bill’s primary co-sponsors gave a variety of reasons for its introduction. According to the statement, the bill would help Ohio families by allowing them to “schedule school year and summer time child-care arrangements with more ease.” The longer school break would also allow families to have “a larger time frame to schedule summer vacations.”

HB 191 specifically prohibits Ohio’s school districts and community schools from holding extracurricular events on the Friday through Monday of the Labor Day weekend. Why? The ultimate reason for the expanded school break, according to the statement is to “create a broader scope of time for Ohio’s tourism, recreation and retail industries to benefit.”

Rep. Hayes has gone on record as being inspired to write the legislation by a Buckeye Lake “boat storage guy” who lamented to the lawmaker about how the school year shuts down the economy of the state.

Since its introduction on April 7, members of the Boating Associations of Ohio, the Ohio Campground Owners Association and other tourism groups have lobbied in support of the legislation. According to the Ohio Secretary of State’s Campaign Finance records, Rep. Hayes filed reports showing he received campaign contributions from the Ohio Tourism PAC as well as the Boat Ohio PAC within a month of dropping HB 191. Additionally, less than one month prior to introducing the legislation, Hayes reported receiving a campaign contribution from the Ohio Campground Owners Association PAC.

Boating Associations of Ohio Executive Director Ken Alvey affirmed the importance of HB 191 at a May legislative conference, saying:

“More and more schools have been opening up before Labor Day, which cuts into the boating season and takes away a number of recreational opportunities for families. When you think about all the vacation and tourism dollars at stake, it really is a big deal.”

Colton Henson, Hayes’ legislative aide expects the legislation to clear the House Education Committee and go to the floor of the House in early 2012. He reaffirmed the economic aspects of the bill when he was quoted in an article in the HudsonHubTimes.

“Many tourism businesses in Ohio count on summer as the time when they do almost all of their business,” said Henson. “Tourism is Ohio’s third largest industry. In this economic climate, we want to work together to promote our economy.”

HB 191 is scheduled for a hearing in the Ohio House Education Committee which meets Wednesday, Dec. 14 at 5:00 p.m. in Room 313.

MLK award winners announced

This year, CEA is proud to announce co-recipients of the 2012 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Humanitarian Award, Pastor Dale B. Snyder and Priscilla Tyson. Jimmie Beall will receive the Helen Jenkins Davis Award.

Pastor Dale B. Snyder, senior pastor of Bethel AME Church in Linden, is a third-generation social activist. He started early, talking about social justice around the dinner table and on the many fishing trips he took with his father, an African Methodist Episcopal minister, and grandfather. His older brothers were involved in black nationalist politics and issues of black identity. Conversation was always about liberation and human rights. Snyder also learned the value of organizing, when his father started a construction company rehabilitating homes, and the business grew into a unionized company focused on street and highway projects. He followed along, becoming a journeyman machine operator.

After attending business school and Ashland Theological Seminary, Snyder worked for government and private firms, and along the way, always supported union activities. He lobbied for Ohio House Bill 584, supporting set asides for minority contractors. He lobbied to include minority contractors in the construction of Linden-McKinley HS. He joined with the NAACP demanding minority contracting opportunities during Ohio State University’s building spree. Pastor Snyder has joined the city’s efforts to reduce violence among African-American youth.

During this past election campaign, Snyder rallied 96 AME churches to gather signatures against SB 5 and became Franklin County’s outreach coordinator for We Are Ohio. He also helped persuade officials to allow weekend voting before the election and brought in a record number of new voters, helping the disenfranchised gain a voice.

Priscilla R. Tyson has been focused on giving back during most of her career, always bringing her passion and talents to the task of improving the community. A business graduate of Franklin University, Tyson served as vice president of community development at National City Bank and at Grant/Riverside Methodist Hospital. She was founding executive director of City Year Columbus, providing leadership to the entire Midwest program, inspiring young people to invest in their communities and improve life for their neighbors and themselves.

Tyson served as president of the Columbus Civil Service Commission, promoting excellence in city services, and on the board of the Greater Columbus Arts Council and Greater Columbus Creative Cultural Commission, both dedicated to growing and sustaining the arts locally. Elected to Columbus City Council in 2007, Tyson has specialized in consensus building, problem solving and planning, serving on multiple committees. She wholeheartedly commits herself to making our community a better place to live.

Jimmie K. Beall, is a guidance counselor at Monroe Alternative MS. Beall has devoted a large part of her educational career to protecting human rights. She has been an active member of the CEA GLBT caucus and opened our eyes to the need for social justice for GLBT Association members and students. She conducts workshops on GLBT awareness for Columbus teachers and counselors, confronting issues of bullying and creating a safe learning environment for employees and students. Her sessions during professional development conferences are among the most popular for teachers from all backgrounds.

Beall, who is now pursing her doctorate in urban educational administration, has lived what she preaches. With a great deal of courage, she filed what would be a landmark discrimination lawsuit against the London City Board of Education. In 2006, a federal judge ruled that gay men and women are entitled to fundamental rights and protections in the workplace.

The Jan. 12 dinner at the Hyatt Regency will feature keynote speaker Rev. Jesse Jackson. While an undergraduate, Jackson became involved in the civil rights movement. In 1965, he went to Selma, Alabama, to march with Dr. King. He was in Memphis with King when the civil rights leader was assassinated on Apr. 4, 1968. In the 1980s, he became a leading national spokesman for African Americans. After being appointed special envoy to Africa, he was awarded the 2000 Presidential Medal of Freedom.

We congratulate these outstanding community members who serve as role models for us all. Come and help us honor them. Get your tickets, $30 each, now by calling CEA at 253-4731.